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DCN waiting areas: Dress for the Weather

Visualisation of one of the proposed DCN waiting areas. Image by Dress for the Weather
Visualisation of one of the proposed DCN waiting areas. Image by Dress for the Weather

Glasgow based design team Dress for the Weather have been commissioned to develop enhanced designs for 9 DCN waiting areas. Dress for the Weather are working to organise any potential ‘clutter’ in these spaces, as well as to provide upgraded furniture, artwork, colour schemes, and additional distraction.

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Artist residency programme

The benefits of the outdoors are well documented, and users of the new RHSC and DCN will have access to 18 of the courtyards and terraces around the building. Working with HLM Architects this project will enhance these spaces to make attractive retreats where patients, families and staff can enjoy fresh air and nature, with different spaces set aside for peace and reflection, social interaction and play activities.

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Programmable spaces

A flexible exhibition wall display system will be created.
A flexible exhibition wall display system will be created.

The new hospitals will contain two areas for changing exhibitions, these include the main DCN Outpatients corridor and Pod Atrium space.

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Snoezelen Room: Southpaw

Visualisation of the proposed Snoezelen Room. Image by Southpaw
Visualisation of the proposed Snoezelen Room. Image by Southpaw

A Snoezelen room is a controlled multi-sensory environment which is specially designed for sensory therapy. The new RHSC Snoezelen room has been developed by Southpaw and offers multisensory stimulation that can be easily adjusted to range from soothing to stimulating depending on need.

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Multi-sensory design and distraction imagery: Alexander Hamilton, Dr Oli Mival and DKAV

Building on the success of the ‘Secret Garden’ installation at the current RHSC, three rehabilitation rooms have been identified across the new RHSC and DCN. These rooms are suitable for immersive interactive technology aimed at enhancing therapeutic benefit. A team headed by artist Alex Hamilton and Dr Oli Mival from the Napier University’s Centre for Interactive Design are developing a sophisticated technology platform which will enable clinical staff and patients to engage with a number of apps through interactive projection. The team are also developing a projection system for many treatment rooms throughout the hospital which will offer tailored video projections for interest and distraction whilst patients are undergoing a test, examination or procedure.

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Bedside environment: DKAV and Ginkgo

Illustration of the functionalities and network of the bedside environment and patient entertainment system.
Illustration of the functionalities and network of the bedside environment and patient entertainment system.

This project enhances the immediate patient environment within each shared or single room through providing the ability for patients to control lighting and temperature along with access to screen based creative content and distraction. Independent audio visual consultant Derek Kemp (DKAV) is currently supporting the team to develop the best approach to providing a versatile patient entertainment system.

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Sanctuary and bereavement services: Sue Lawty and Ginkgo

The interior design of the RHSC and DCN prayer/meditation/reflection space includes an outdoor courtyard. It’s known as the ‘Sanctuary’, designed by Sue Lawty, will be implemented by Ginkgo Projects. Sue has also created a subtle and sensitive design for several rooms within the two Bereavement Suites. The design focuses on qualities of natural materials and a balance between privacy and openness for each space which reflects Sue’s own work using textiles and natural materials.

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Shared adolescent spaces: Dress for the Weather

Concept proposal for the adolescent dining/recreation room. Image by Dress for the Weather.
Concept proposal for the adolescent dining/recreation room. Image by Dress for the Weather.

A strong preference for an exclusive adolescent space within the new hospital has been identified through consultation with young people. Design team Dress for the Weather have received an extended commission to enhance the interior design of two exclusive adolescent spaces.

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CAMHS enhanced group areas and bedrooms: Projects Office

Dressed for the Weather CAMHS research drawing

The Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services department will be on the ground floor of the new hospital, with access to several external courtyards. Design team Projects Office have been appointed to enhance the interior design of the communal areas as well as to create opportunities for patients to personalise their bedrooms during their stay. The team have undertaken lengthy engagement with patients, families and staff, facilitated by artist James Leadbitter. One key theme that emerged as a common response to the question ‘What does good mental health feel like?’ was the environment of the seaside and coast. Projects Office have worked to develop a design which centres around this theme.

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RHSC and DCN interview rooms, sitting rooms and drop in centre: Dress for the Weather

Dress for the Weather Small Interview Room illustration

Design team Dress for the Weather have also been commissioned to develop an enhanced interior design strategy for the interview rooms, the sitting rooms within the new RHSC and DCN and also the RHSC drop-in centre. The interview rooms are an important and often sensitive environment, and the team have developed a subtle design which focuses on allowing users to feel both comfortable and secure. A theme has been developed for each of the sitting rooms, relating it to a more domestic counterpart. These include a games room, reading room, and solarium. The drop-in centre design is multi-functional, adaptable, homely, and will include bespoke patterns created with users and staff of the current service.

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