Subscribe

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

Subscribe

Subscribe elementum semper nisi. Aenean vulputate eleifend tellus.

Introducing: Kate Ive

So inspired by staff, archives, histories, stories, identities, technology and learning about different professions, artist Kate Ive found it difficult to settle on only a few ideas to pursue. With 19 separate pieces in development, Kate is producing a suite of work that will be displayed throughout the new building to act as wayfinding and pieces of re-imagined histories linked directly to units. Kate is using a variety of materials in her work: copper plated plant roots will go to form a torso like form of arteries and veins; images of bandaging techniques from old nursing manuals and Golgi apparatus are re-created in ceramic; an old fashioned radiology vest is being re-designed with pliable lead just to name a few.

After spending time with staff, Kate came to understand that hospital environments can feel overwhelming with the amount of information being displayed. ‘One of the things that has fed into my work is staff saying hospitals are so full of things, there is stuff everywhere. That when you work there you quickly stop seeing things and they just become the fabric of the building as opposed to things to enjoy and look at. I’m really aware staff will be there long hours, some patients and families are there long term and that’s why in all of the works I have tried to incorporate something that requires you look a bit harder or try to engage with it in a different way.’

 

 

An example of historic illustrations of hand bandaging instructions (above) and Kate’s early porcelain work re-creating the bandage knots. Eventually the porcelain pieces will be mounted into a cabinet and labelled in an old style as seen in the illustration.

 

 

Below Kate is holding an image of the Golgi apparatus which inspired her to create the forms in porcelain enhancing them using the mocha diffusion technique to mimic the Golgi staining technique used to visualise nervous tissue under microscope.